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CHE 105/110 Introduction to Chemistry - Exercises and Answers

Other Units: Temperature and Density

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QUESTION ANSWER

1.

Perform the following conversions.

  1. 255°F to degrees Celsius
  2. −255°F to degrees Celsius
  3. 50.0°C to degrees Fahrenheit
  4. −50.0°C to degrees Fahrenheit

1.

  1. 124°C
  2. −159°C
  3. 122°F
  4. −58°F

3.

Perform the following conversions.

  1. 100.0°C to kelvins
  2. −100.0°C to kelvins
  3. 100 K to degrees Celsius
  4. 300 K to degrees Celsius

3.

  1. 373 K
  2. 173 K
  3. −173°C
  4. 27°C

5.

Convert 0 K to degrees Celsius. What is the significance of the temperature in degrees Celsius?

5.

−273°C. This is the lowest possible temperature in degrees Celsius.

7.

The hottest temperature ever recorded on the surface of the earth was 136°F in Libya in 1922. What is the temperature in degrees Celsius and in kelvins?

7.

57.8°C; 331 K

9.

Give at least three possible units for density.

9.

g/mL, g/L, and kg/L (answers will vary)

11.

A sample of iron has a volume of 48.2 cm3. What is its mass?

11.

379 g

13.

The volume of hydrogen used by the Hindenburg, the German airship that exploded in New Jersey in 1937, was 2.000 × 108 L. If hydrogen gas has a density of 0.0899 g/L, what mass of hydrogen was used by the airship?

13.

1.80 × 107 g

15.

A typical engagement ring has 0.77 cm3 of gold. What mass of gold is present?

15.

15 g

17.

What is the volume of 100.0 g of lead if lead has a density of 11.34 g/cm3?

17.

8.818 cm3

19.

What is the volume in liters of 222 g of neon if neon has a density of 0.900 g/L?

19.

247 L

21.

Which has the greater volume, 100.0 g of iron (d = 7.87 g/cm3) or 75.0 g of gold (d = 19.3 g/cm3)?

21.

The 100.0 g of iron has the greater volume.

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