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PSY 180 - Psychology of Aging - Textbook

Licensing & Attribution

PSY 180 Psychology of Aging

Compiled by Stacey Cooper

Conditions of Use:

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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Chapter 1: Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Introduction to Aging


 

Chapter Learning Objectives

  • Understand what gerontology is as a field of study.
  • Examine how demography is used to track the elderly population and how this relates to phases of aging.
  • Evaluate how aging varies across cultures and what it means to be elderly.
  • Define the difference between centenarians and supercentenarians.
  • Evaluate the varied challenges that elderly persons face, including physical challenges, stereotyping, discrimination, financial issues, elder abuse and a loss of independence. Define the types and signs of elder abuse.
  • Identify the need for and services provided by psychologists in improving the mental health care of the elderly.

 

Chapter Key Points

  • People over ninety years of age now account for 4.7 percent of the older population, defined as age sixty-five or above; this percentage is expected to reach 10 percent by the year 2050 (U.S. Census Bureau 2011).
  • As of 2013, the U.S. Census Bureau reports that 14.1 percent of the total U.S. population is sixty-five years old or older.
  • The social study of aging uses population data and cohorts to predict social concerns related to aging populations.
  • As people enter old age, they face challenges, including the loss of independence diminished physical ability and age discrimination. 
  • As people enter old age, they face challenges, including the loss of independence diminished physical ability and age discrimination. 
  • Psychologists play an important role in addressing the needs of the growing elderly population.

(Learning Objectives, Key Points, and Basic Terms content by Professor Stacey Cooper is licensed under CC BY 4.0.)