Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
Hostos Library Banner

EDU 105 - Social Studies for Young Children - Textbook

Module 2 - Part 2

Connecting Social Studies to Standards

Work by Jacqueline M. DiSanto is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


Learning Outcomes

 

Students will be able discuss the development of skills as a student progresses through early-childhood through grade 4. For example, using pictures to explain plot leads to writing a paragraph to summarize the plot. This will be done by responding to an online discussion related to this activity:

  • Consider the practices found on Pages 4-11 in the framework. Follow three of them from the Kindergarten (K) column across to Grade 4 noticing how the skills expand as the grades increase.

  • Respond to the Discussions forum marked "Module 2/Part 2: Practices 1".

After reading the last page of the attached content, choose one category of practices and see if you can identify the "Self and Others" themes to which it would apply. For example:

  • C. Comparison and Contextualization

  • 1. Identify similarities and differences between home and school.

This could apply to Geography, Humans, and the Environment.

Post your responses under the Discussions forum for "Module 2/Part 2: Practices 2".


Before we begin to connect social-studies concepts with specific standards, let us review something from the first learning module:

Social Studies is an umbrella subject that includes topics covered in each of the other content areas.  NCSS has established ten thematic strands for Social Studies and provides explanations for each strand (National Council for the Social Studies [NCSS], 2019).  They are:

  • Culture

  • Time, Continuance, and Change

  • People, Places, and Environments

  • Individual Development and Identity

  • Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

  • Power, Authority, and Governance

  • Production, Distribution, and Consumption

  • Science, Technology, and Society

  • Global Connections

  • Civic Ideals and Practices
     

Let’s match these themes to course you might have studied in high school or college: 
 

THEME

SOCIAL-STUDIES SUBJECT AREA

Culture

Anthropology, Sociology

Time, Continuance, and Change

History

People, Places, and Environments

Geography, Public Policy

Individual Development and Identity

Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology

Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology

Power, Authority, and Governance

Law, Political Science

Production, Distribution, and Consumption

Economics

Science, Technology, and Society

Math, Science, Technology

Global Connections

Ecology, Global Culture, Economics, Humanities 

Civic Ideals and Practices

Civics, Cultural Anthropology, History, Law, Political Science

 

In kindergarten, students study “Self and Others.” The course is organized into five units of study—Individual Development and Cultural Identity; Civic Ideals and Practices; Geography, Humans, and the Environment; Time, Continuity, and Change; and Economic Systems. This is what it looks like when we match those headings with the ten thematic themes from the NCSS:

 

NCSS THEME

COLLEGE SUBJECTS

NYSED “SELF AND OTHERS”

Culture

Anthropology, Sociology Individual Development and Cultural Identity

Time, Continuance, and Change

History Time, Continuity, and Change

People, Places, and Environments

Geography, Public Policy

Individual Development and Cultural Identity

Civic Ideals and Practices

Geography, Humans, and the Environment

Time, Continuity, and Change

Individual Development and Identity

Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology Individual Development and Cultural Identity

Individuals, Groups, and Institutions

Anthropology, Political Science, Sociology

Individual Development and Cultural Identity

Civic Ideals and Practices

Economic Systems

Power, Authority, and Governance

Law, Political Science

Civic Ideals and Practices

Economic Systems

Production, Distribution, and Consumption

Economics

Time, Continuity, and Change

Economic Systems

Science, Technology, and Society

Math, Science, Technology Geography, Humans, and the Environment

Global Connections

Ecology, Humanities 

Individual Development and Cultural Identity

Geography, Humans, and the Environment

Civic Ideals and Practices

Civics, Law

Individual Development and Cultural Identity

Civic Ideals and Practices

 

The New York State framework for kindergarten Social-Studies outlines the following practices and how they are evidence in Social Studies:

 

  1. Gathering, Interpreting and Using Evidence
    1. Ask questions.

    2. Recognize forms of evidence used to make meaning in social studies.

    3. Identify the author or creator of a book or map.

    4. Identify opinions expressed by others.

 

  1. Chronological Reasoning and Causation
    1. Retell an important life event in sequential order.

    2. Understand the concept of time measurements, including days and weeks.

    3. Identify causes and effects, using an example from his/her family life.

    4. Identify change over time in his/her life.

    5. Identify events of the past, present, and future in his/her life.

    6. Identify routines and common occurrences in his/her life.
       

  1. Comparison and Contextualization
    1. Identify similarities and differences between home and school.

    2. Identify similarities and differences between him/her and others.

    3. Describe an event in his/her life.
       

  1. Geographic Reasoning
    1. Ask geographic questions about where places are located and why they are located there, using location terms and geographic representations, such as maps, photographs, satellite images, and models.  

    2. Identify natural events or physical features, such as land, water, air, and wind.

    3. Describe how environment affects his/her activities.

    4. Identify a pattern.

    5. Identify a human activity that changed a place.
       

  1. Economics and Economic Systems
    1. Identify examples of scarcity and choices made due to scarcity.

    2. Identify examples of goods and services.

    3. Identify what money is and how it is used in society.
       
  1. Civic Participation
    1. Demonstrate respect for the rights of others.

    2. Participate in activities that focus on a classroom or school issue or problem.

    3. Identify the role of the individual in classroom participation.

    4. Show respect in issues involving difference and conflict.

    5. Identify situations in which social actions are required.

    6. Identify the school principal and their role within the school.

    7. Identify and follow rules in the classroom and school.


Notice that the themes from “Self and Others” are represented under more than one of the NCSS strands.  That is because Social Studies takes a constructivist approach by allowing students to scaffold their knowledge, experiences, and understanding of a subject as they encounter it under different topics and through varied activities.  This leads to the building of skills, concepts, and opinions that will lead students toward success in Social Studies as it grows in both scope and sophistication at each new grade level. Remember the outcome is a functioning, participating member of society.