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EDU 111 - Teaching Math & Science to Young Children - Textbook

Chapter 2: Math & Science Connections

2.1 Closing the Achievement Gap in Math & Science

2.1: Closing the Achievement Gap in Math & Science

"Closing the Achievement Gap in Math and Science" by The National Science Foundation (NSF) is in the Public Domain.
 

The latest results from the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Math and Science Partnership (MSP) program show not only improved proficiency among all elementary and middle school students, but also a closing of the achievement gaps between both African-American and Hispanic students and white students in elementary school math, and between African-American and white students in elementary and middle-school science.

 

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2.2 Science: Matter & Energy

2.2: Science: Matter & Energy

"Science: Matter & Energy" in the CUNY HSE Curriculum Framework by CUNY Adult Literacy PD Team is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

 

Making connections between science and math can help students see how math is applied in the world. It also helps deepen students’ scientific understanding. Without an understanding of the powers of ten, many students think about atoms and cells being about the same size. They’re both really small, right? In fact, there are about the same number of atoms in a human cell as there are cells in the human body.

It is also important for students to understand that their success on the HSE test, and in college, will depend on their ability to apply their skills in different contents. Science offers a rich way to explore math skills such as conversion, understanding of functions, use of formulas, and proportional reasoning. This is a list of some possible mathematical connections to the Science curriculum map.

 

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2.3: What Are My Children Watching? Analyzing the Scientific & Mathematical Questions of Preschool Television Shows

2.3: What Are My Children Watching? Analyzing the Scientific & Mathematical Questions of Preschool Television Shows Using Process Skills

"What Are My Children Watching? Analyzing the Scientific & Mathematical Questions of Preschool Television Shows Using Process Skills" in Creative Education by Donna Farland-Smith and Theodore Chao is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.


In an effort to compare what process skills preschoolers were exposed to during an average episode of Sid the Science Kid and an average episode of Team Umizoomi 35 episodes of each were compared using T-test statistical analysis. The goal of this study was to analyze evidence of process skills in each episode: observing, inferring, classifying, measuring, predicting, and communicating and compare each math and science show and determine their differences in their use of inquiry to presentation science and mathematics content. Results demonstrated a significant difference between the two shows with preschoolers being exposed to observing and communicating when watching Sid the Science Kid and preschoolers being exposed to classifying and measuring while watching Team Umizoomi. In addition, it is worth mentioning that young children watching Team Umizoomi are experiencing more questions when compared with Sid the Science Kid.

 

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2.5: All Things STEAM

2.5: All Things STEAM

"All Things STEAM" by Amy Koester is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.


Amy Koester is a public librarian and the Learning Experiences Manager at her library. When it comes to developing science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) programming, she turns to a number of go-to resources for inspiration and concept knowledge support. 

Amy's list of resources include a preschool science series, science club series, school-age science series, STEAM programs, STEAM story time crafts, STEAM videos, and resources explaining STEAM concepts.

 

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2.6: An Investigation of Preschoolers' Perceptions About Science and Mathematics Through Metaphors

2.6: An Investigation of Preschoolers' Perceptions About Science and Mathematics Through Metaphors

"An Investigation of Preschoolers' Perceptions About Science and Mathematics Through Metaphors" in European Journal of Education Studies by Meltem Emen and Durmuş Aslan is licensed under CC BY 4.0.


Mathematics and science are important concepts that children’s encounter in both daily and educational life. Early childhood is the time in which the first ideas of the mathematics and science developed. In this study, we investigated children’s perceptions about mathematics and science through metaphors in terms of being able to provide rich information. This study was qualitative research in the form of phenomenological. Participants consisted of 88 children from five and six years old groups. As a data collection tool, we used a semi-structured interview form. As a result of the analysis, we found out that there were five positive and one negative category about mathematics. The category that was used most commonly about mathematics was “mathematics as a part of education”. On the other hand, all of the metaphors about science were in the positive category. Metaphors about science were grouped under four categories. The category that included the highest number of metaphors was “science that involves phenomena and creatures in nature”. In conclusion, children’s metaphors about mathematics included elements such as “homework, line, and course”, while the metaphors about science included elements such as “nature, curiosity, and research”.

 

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